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6,500 Families in Madrid Affected by Lack of Land Ownership

6.500 familias en Madrid afectadas por la falta de propiedad del suelo

In Madrid, a problem faced by 6,500 families is the lack of land ownership on which their homes are built. 30 years ago, the City Council granted land for the construction of protected buildings through cooperatives in what was known as the Plan 18,000. However, this urban development project has proven to be a challenge for both the City Council and the affected parties.

The Plan 18,000 was an initiative of the Madrid City Council carried out between 1984 and 1997 to address the high demand for real estate at that time. The council provided plots of Municipal Heritage Land for the construction of social housing under a cooperative system. Beneficiaries could have their homes built on the granted land for free, reducing the final cost of the housing. These homes, located in various districts of the city, were intended for low-income workers and young people.

According to Magencio López, a member of the Association Platform of Those Affected by Plan 18,000 Land, all these homes were built under social housing regulations for 30 years, and a clause was added to the deeds that stipulated the free transfer of land for 75 years. However, only those with higher incomes had the option to pay for the land at the time of purchase.

The situation has become complicated for around 8,000 homes, as since 1992 the City Council has offered land lessees the opportunity to acquire the land through different terms and conditions. Some families have managed to purchase the land and free themselves from this problem, but approximately 6,500 homes are still trapped in this situation.

It is important to note that in January 2018, many of these plots were disqualified as protected housing. However, on July 7, 2020, all political parties unanimously approved the “Agreements of the Villa,” which establish that no land or housing intended for public protection can be transferred by the City Council and will become the heritage and ownership of all inhabitants of Madrid and the city itself.

Frequently Asked Questions:

1. What is Plan 18,000?
Plan 18,000 was an initiative of the Madrid City Council carried out between 1984 and 1997 to address the high demand for real estate at that time. It involved the provision of land by the City Council for the construction of social housing under a cooperative system.

2. How did Plan 18,000 work?
Beneficiaries of Plan 18,000 had the opportunity to have their homes built on the granted land for free, reducing the final cost of the housing. These homes were intended for low-income workers and young people.

3. What is the current issue related to Plan 18,000?
Approximately 6,500 homes built under Plan 18,000 are facing a lack of land ownership. Since 1992, the City Council has offered land lessees the opportunity to acquire the land, but many families have not been able to do so.

4. What happened in January 2018 related to these homes?
In January 2018, many of the plots where these homes were built were disqualified as protected housing.

5. What is the latest development related to this issue?
On July 7, 2020, all political parties unanimously approved the “Agreements of the Villa,” which establish that no land or housing intended for public protection can be transferred by the City Council. They will become the heritage and ownership of all inhabitants of Madrid and the city itself.

Key Definitions:

– Protected buildings: These are homes that are constructed to provide affordable housing for low-income individuals.

– Cooperative system: It is a model of ownership in which several individuals come together to acquire or build a home collectively.

– Municipal Heritage Land: Refers to land owned by the City Council that can be used for various purposes, including housing construction.

Related Links:

– Madrid City Council
– Housing in Madrid